The Highlander Golf Shop
Letter F - Golf Definitions, Terms, Vocabulary and Slang
F
Face
The surface of the clubhead that strikes the ball.
Face Angle
Position of the club face relative to the intended line of ball flight. For right-handed golfers, a square face angle aligns directly at the target, an open face aligns to the right, while a closed face aligns left.
Fade
Type of shot that generally tends to curve to the right in the air (assuming a right-handed player.) A fade is a controlled shot preferred by many players.
Fairway
The short grass between the tee and the green.
Fairway Percentage
The number of fairways hit (the ball lands on the fairway) off of the tee (first shot) divided by the number of holes played in a round, tournament or season.
False front
A green that has such a significant slope at the front that approach shots are likely to roll back off.
Fan
To miss hitting the ball completely. The air moves, but nothing else does.
Fat
Shot type in which a player hits behind the ball, resulting in a much shorter shot than normal. Fat shots are often characterized by a player taking an excessive divot.
Female Bogey Golfer
A female bogey golfer is a player who has a Course Handicap of approximately 24 on a course of standard difficulty. She can hit tee shots an average of 150 yards and reach a 280-yard hole in two shots.
Female Scratch Golfer
A female scratch golfer is a player who has a course handicap of approximately 0 on a course of standard difficulty and can hit tee shots an average of 210 yards and can reach a 400-yard hole in two shots at sea level.
Ferrule
Decorative trim ring, directly on top of the hosel on many woods and irons.
First Cut
Term given to a section of rough (or higher grass) directly bordering a fairway. The first cut of rough is deemed to be considered "light" rough and may vary from a few yards wide to over 10 yards wide, depending upon the course.
Five-Minute Rule
The amount of time (5 minutes) that the USGA Rules allow a player to look for his ball. A ball not found after 5 minutes after the search for it is begun is considered to be lost.
Flagstick
Also called the pin, flag, or stick, the flagstick marks the hole.
Flagstick
Also called the pin, flag, or stick, the flagstick marks the hole.
Flange
Mainly applies to putters, it's the part of the putter from behind the face to the very back of the head.
Flat Lie
A lie flatter than specification. For example, if the spec is 60 degrees, a 2 degree flat club would have a lie angle of 58 degrees.
Flex
The relative bending properties of a golf club shaft. Flex is usually identified by a letter: L for Ladies, A for Amateur, R for regular, S for Stiff, X for Extra Stiff and TX for Tour Extra Stiff flex.
Flop shot
A high, delicate shot that travels only a short distance and then rolls very little once it lands on the green. Essentially, it is flopped onto the green.
Flow Weighting
Head design where weight positioning shifts from one club to the next. For example, a #1 iron may have more weight concentrated on its toe, a #2 iron slightly less, and so on.
Flub
A terrible shot.
Flyer (Flier)
A shot that flies substantially longer than desired, usually as a result of too much grass between the club face and ball. Flyers are more common from the rough than from the shorter fairway grasses.
Follow-through
The part of the swing beyond impact with the ball.
Fore
Term yelled toward a group who may be in danger of being hit by an errant shot. The sound of fore is a danger warning to take cover to avoid injury by being struck with a ball.
Fore Caddie
One who directs golfers to their balls during competition. The fore caddy positions himself in the vicinity of where the tee shots will land, and marks its placement.
Form Forged
Iron club head manufacturing process in which a club is first investment cast from an alloy of carbon steel and then formed to shape through a series of forging dies.
Four Ball
A matchplay or strokeplay game of two players on each side in which two players play their better ball against the better ball of two other players.
Four-jack
To take four putts on a hole. Only tolerable for those who can drive the green on a par five. When asked how he four-jacked a hole at the Masters, Steve Ballesteros replied, "I miss. I miss. I miss. I make." Well said.
Four-jack
To take four putts on a hole. Only tolerable for those who can drive the green on a par five. When asked how he four-jacked a hole at the Masters, Steve Ballesteros replied, "I miss. I miss. I miss. I make." Well said.
Foursome
A match in which two players play against two others, with each side playing one ball. "Foursome" is also applied to any group of 4 golfers playing together; though this is not the USGA definition.
Fried Egg
Lie in a sand bunker in which most of the ball is below the surface of the sand. Visually, the ball looks like a "fried egg", hence the term.
Fringe
Area of grass that borders a putting green. The fringe is typically higher than the grass on the green, but lower than the grass on the fairway.
Froghair
Thick, tall grass that borders the fringe on certain courses. The froghair, due to its thickness, is a very difficult area from which to play a controlled shot.
Front Nine
The first nine holes of an eighteen hole round.
Full set
The 14 clubs which are allowed for playing a round. A full set usually consists of three or four wooden clubs or metal woods, nine or ten irons and a putter.
Funnies
Term used to describe various unusual (both positive or negative) events which may happen in the course of a game.
Futures Tour
Professional golf circuit for women players, one level away from the LPGA Tour. The top players on the Futures Tour each year gain membership in the LPGA Tour for the following season.